CA Marijuana Decriminalization Drops Youth Crime Rate

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CA Marijuana Decriminalization Drops Youth Crime Rate

Postby ecigsnet » Fri Nov 30, 2012 6:46 pm

Between 2010 and 2011, California experienced a drastic 20 percent decrease in juvenile crime--bringing the underage crime rate to the lowest level since the state started keeping records in 1954.

California Youth Crime Plunges to All-Time Low

The San Francisco-based Center on Juvenile & Criminal Justice (CJCJ) recently released a policy briefing with an analysis of arrest data collected by the California Department of Justice’s Criminal Justice Statistics Center. The briefing, “California Youth Crime Plunges to All-Time Low,” identifies a new state marijuana decriminalization law that applies to juveniles, not just adults, as the driving force behind the plummeting arrest totals.

Read the Full PDF Report: Center on Juvenile & Criminal Justice

Huffington Post reports:

The study, entitled "California Youth Crime Plunges to All-Time Low" and released by the San Francisco-based Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice, looked at the number of people under the age of 18 who were arrested in the state over the past eight decades. The research not only found juvenile crime to be at its lowest level ever but, in the wake of then-Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signing a bill reducing the punishment for possessing a small amount of marijuana from a misdemeanor to simply an infraction, the drop in rates was particularity significant.

AlterNet reports:

California’s 2010 law did not legalize marijuana, but it officially knocked down "simple" possession of less than one ounce to an infraction from a misdemeanor--and it applies to minors, not just people over 21. Police don’t arrest people for infractions; usually, they ticket them. And infractions are punishable not by jail time, but by fines--a $100 fine in California in the case of less than one ounce of pot.

"I think it was pretty courageous not to put an age limit on it," said Males, a longtime researcher on juvenile justice and a former sociology professor at the University of California at Santa Cruz. Arresting and putting low-level juvenile offenders into the criminal-justice system pulls many kids deeper into trouble rather than turning them around, Males said, a conclusion many law-enforcement experts share.

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Re: CA Marijuana Decriminalization Drops Youth Crime Rate

Postby iamthestreets » Mon Dec 03, 2012 11:40 am

They should just legalize it already. This is ridiculous. There are so many other crimes and drugs to be worried about and Marijuana is not one of them imo.
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Re: CA Marijuana Decriminalization Drops Youth Crime Rate

Postby admin » Fri Dec 07, 2012 7:49 am

It looks like the majority of Americans agree with you.

In this article by the Huffington Post, it reports,

"Fifty-one percent of Americans in the new HuffPost/YouGov poll said that in the two states that have legalized marijuana use for adults, the federal government should exempt any adults following state laws from federal drug law enforcement. Only 30 percent said the federal government should enforce its drug laws in those states in the same way it does in any other state."

That does not seem to deter the Obama Administration from continuing to put peaceful people in jail for victimless, non-violent crimes such as smoking pot.

A New York Times report has cast doubt on whether the two states will be able to put their new laws into effect unencumbered by the federal government, suggesting the Obama administration may pursue legal action to block the two states' laws, which contradict federal laws that make marijuana use illegal. The new HuffPost/YouGov poll suggests this would be an unpopular move by the federal government, although the survey asked about enforcement of drug laws against individuals, rather than action to block the state laws.


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